All the statistical data we have found on the subject is listed here. Know something we don't? Submit it here : What is your statistic or fact relating to homelessness? What is the source? Do you have a link to the source?
Homelessness in other Countries.
Marin County as the fifth richest county in the United States

The "Top 5" rankings are based on the 2015 tax year and were compiled using Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC), which collects data from the IRS.

TRAC reveals that in 2015, the average adjusted gross income (AGI) of Marin County was close to $159,000 -- the highest among California counties and fifth-highest in the nation.

The five richest counties in the U.S. and their average AGI, according to the report, are:


  1. McMullen County, Texas ($303,717)
  2. Teton County, Wyoming ($248,949)
  3. New York County, New York ($210,233)
  4. Glasscock County, Texas ($181,375)
  5. Marin County, California ($158,753)
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development released its annual Point in Time count Wednesday, a report that showed nearly 554,000 homeless people across the country during local tallies conducted in January. That figure is up nearly 1 percent from 2016.

Of that total, 193,000 people had no access to nightly shelter and instead were staying in vehicles, tents, the streets and other places considered uninhabitable. The unsheltered figure is up by more than 9 percent compared to two years ago.


Homeless people suffer the same illnesses experienced by people with homes, but at rates three to six times higher. This includes potentially lethal communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and influenza, as well as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and hypertension.

Homelessness is the condition of people lacking "a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence" as defined by The McKinney–Vento Homeless Assistance Act. According to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development's Annual Homeless Assessment Report, as of 2017 there were around 554,000 homeless people in the United States, or 0.17% of the population.

Homelessness emerged as a national issue in the 1870s. Many homeless people lived in emerging urban cities, such as New York City. Into the 20th century, the Great Depression of the 1930s caused a devastating epidemic of poverty, hunger, and homelessness. There were two million homeless people migrating across the United States. In the 1960s, the deinstitutionalization of patients from state psychiatric hospitals, according to the physician's medical libraries on use of pharmaceuticals, was a precipitating factor which seeded the population of people that are homeless.

The number of homeless people grew in the 1980s, as housing and social service cuts increased. After many years of advocacy and numerous revisions, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the McKinney–Vento Homeless Assistance Act in 1987; this remains the only piece of federal legislation that allocates funding to the direct service of homeless people. Over the past decades, the availability and quality of data on homelessness has improved considerably. About 1.56 million people, or about 0.5% of the U.S. population, used an emergency shelter or a transitional housing program between October 1, 2008 and September 30, 2009. Homelessness in the United States increased after the Great Recession.

In the year 2009, one out of 50 children or 1.5 million children in United States of America will be homeless each year. There were an estimated 57,849 homeless veterans estimated in the United States during January 2013, or 12 percent of all homeless adults. Just under 8 percent of homeless U.S. veterans are female. Texas, California and Florida have the highest numbers of unaccompanied homeless youth under the age of 18, comprising 58% of the total homeless under 18 youth population.  Homelessness affects men more than women. In the United States, about 60% of all homeless adults are men.

Because of turnover in the population of people that are homeless, the total number of people who experience homelessness for at least a few nights during the course of a year is thought to be considerably higher than point-in-time counts. A 2000 study estimated the number of such people to be between 2.3 million and 3.5 million.  According to Amnesty International USA, vacant houses outnumber homeless people by five times. A December 2017 investigation by Philip Alston, the U.N. Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, found that homeless persons have effectively been criminalized throughout many cities in the United States.

Causes of homelessness in the United States include lack of affordable housing, divorce, lawful eviction, negative cash flow, post traumatic stress disorder, foreclosure, fire, natural disasters (hurricane, earthquake, or flood), mental illness, physical disability, having no family or supportive relatives, substance abuse, lack of needed services, elimination of pensions and unemployment entitlements, no or inadequate income sources (such as Social Security, stock dividends, or annuity), poverty (no net worth), gambling, unemployment, and low-paying jobs. Homelessness in the United States affects many segments of the population, including families, children, domestic violence victims, ex-convicts, veterans, and the aged. Efforts to assist the homeless include federal legislation, non-profit efforts, increased access to healthcare services, supportive housing, and affordable housing.


There are 2.5 million homeless children in America. The get that number from two primary sources: school districts, which are required to report on the number of homeless students they serve, and censuses of homeless shelters and temporary housing conducted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Some 4.2 million young people experience unaccompanied homelessness in the course of a year, according to a new study from Chapin Hall a research center at the University of Chicago.
Year
2014
2015
2016
2017
Homeless Population
113952
115738
118142
134000
% Increase from year before
-
1.56
2.1
13.4
In 2016, HUD counted 176,357 unsheltered people nationwide on a single night; last year, that number jumped to 192,875. In King County, Washington (which includes Seattle), about 3,372 people—more than half of the county’s unsheltered population—are living in vehicles. And in Greater Los Angeles, which has the largest unsheltered homeless population in the country, more than 15,000 people live in cars, vans, and RVs.

The January 2017 Point-in-Time count, the most recent national estimate of homelessness in the United States, identified 553,742 people experiencing homelessness. This represents a rate of approximately 17 people experiencing homelessness on a given night per 10,000 people in the general population, the lowest rate of homelessness calculated since point-in-time data collection began. The rates in individual states ranged from highs of 110 and 51 in the District of Columbia (D.C.) and Hawaii, respectively, to 5 in Mississippi.


However, the overall number of people experiencing homelessness increased nationally by 0.7 percent between 2016 and 2017. The largest increases in that time period were among unaccompanied children and young adults (14.3 percent), individuals experiencing chronic homelessness (12.2 percent), and people experiencing unsheltered homelessness (9.4 percent). The number of people in families experiencing homelessness decreased by 5.2 percent.

At the time of the 2017 Point-in-Time count, the vast majority of the homeless population lived in some form of shelter or in transitional housing (360,867 people). However, approximately 34 percent (192,875 people) lived in a place not meant for human habitation, such as the street or an abandoned building. Single individuals comprised 66.7 percent of all people experiencing homelessness (369,081 people), and about 33.3 percent were people in families (184,661 adults and children). Approximately 7.2 percent of people counted were veterans (40,056), and 7.4 percent were unaccompanied children and young adults (40,799).

Since 2007, homelessness has decreased overall and across every subpopulation nationally. Overall homelessness decreased 14.4 percent. The most dramatic decreases have been among veterans (34.3 percent), individuals experiencing chronic homelessness (27.4 percent), and people living in unsheltered locations (24.6 percent).


STATE TRENDS IN HOMELESS ASSISTANCE

The majority of states increased permanent supportive housing capacity (33 states reported an increase). The largest increases were in California (3,420 beds), Colorado (2,052 beds), and Texas (1,651 beds). The largest decrease was in Minnesota (1,379 fewer beds). Rapid Re-Housing inventories also increased in a majority of states (34 states and D.C. reported an increase). The largest increases were in California (3,010 beds), New York (2,679 beds), and Massachusetts (2,306 beds). The largest decrease was in Washington (1,570 fewer beds). Most states increased emergency shelter capacity (33 states). The largest increases were in New York (4,989 beds) and California (4,559 beds). Pennsylvania had the largest decrease (382 fewer beds).

Following is the homeless population increase in percentage in California over the years.
Currently, no one is gathering a central database of the specific people in Marin. No one is asking "which town did you lose your home in?" so that we have a name and face to people. One reason not to ask this question is so that specific cities and towns don't have to be responsible for finding a safe legal place to sleep for the specific
people, with names and faces, who were evicted from houses in that town with nowhere to go. We think it is ethical and responsible for each town, city or county to respond practically to insure a safe legal space to sleep, be it in warm protected tents, cars or anywhere else that is safe and legal until those people find more permanent housing. We also believe that each local government is responsible for allowing the construction of low-cost housing that it's residents can afford, preferably by removing the red-tape we have created that demands minimum square footage, expensive hook-ups, high property taxes and a series of codes which insure that no new housing is created in Marin costing less than $600,000. per unit, which is beyond what a large percentage of residents can comfortably afford.


Until each city counts, names and responds to the individuals it renders homeless with high rents and home-prices,
we have created this guide for each city to be responsible for a certain number of people, based on the number of homeless people per 1,000 Marin residents and the number of 1000 people in each town and the unincorporated area of Marin. Since there are 4.77 homeless per 1000 as of the last count (the count can be assumed to be incomplete since it does not factor in the people it does not find for one reason or another) each 1000 people in a city leads to 4.77 homeless being designated as part of that city's responsibility to assist in order to maintain some semblance of human decency and humanity.
City/Town/etc.
San Rafael
Novato
Mill Valley
San Anselmo
Larkspur
Tamalpais-Homestead Valley
Corte Madera
Tiburon
Fairfax
Sausalito
Kentfield
Lucas Valley-Marinwood
Strawberry
Santa Venetia
Marin City
Ross
Sleepy Hollow
Belvedere
Lagunitas-Forest Knolls
Bolinas
Woodacre
Black Point-Green Point
Inverness
Point Reyes Station
Alto
Stinson Beach
San Geronimo
Muir Beach
Dillon Beach
Tomales
Nicasio
​Unincorporated area of Marin
Municipal Type
City
City
City
Town
City
CDP
Town
Town
Town
City
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
Town
CDP
City
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP
CDP


Total

Population (2010 Census)
57713
51904
13903
12336
11926
10735
9253
8962
7441
7061
6485
6094
5393
4292
2666
2415
2384
2068
1819
1620
1348
1306
1304
848
711
632
446
310
283
204
96

18451
252409
Portion of Homeless
275.54
247.81
66.38
58.90
56.94
51.25
44.18
42.79
35.53
33.71
30.96
29.09
25.75
20.49
12.73
11.53
11.38
9.87
8.68
7.73
6.44
6.24
6.23
4.05
3.39
3.02
2.13
1.48
1.35
0.97
0.46
​81.65
Homeless population in 2017:        1117
Homeless per 1000 people:      4.425357257
One day, one city, no relief: To capture San Francisco’s homeless crisis, we sent dozens of journalists onto the streets for 24 hours straight.